montreal91chesnokov_korda

Points won by each set: [ 26-33, 29-25, 34-27 ]
Points won directly behind the serve:
24 % Chesnokov – 20 of 83
15 % Korda – 14 of 91

Strange match. Chesnokov [32] led *3:2 when Korda [40] won seven straight games with a streak of 14 consecutive points. It seemed like a repeat of their first meeting (Philadelphia ’90) when the Czechoslovak won 6-2, 6-4, but Chesnokov completely surprised at *2:4 (15/40) – he saved the first mini-match point with a service winner, and then did something unexpected – played serve-and-volley action. It was a momentum shift – Korda wilted, began trying to shorten the points attacking the net, but in vain. Chesnokov won nine straight games, and another crazy twist appeared on the horizon as Korda improved from 0:5 to 3:5* (deuce). Then he made a backhand error off Chesnokov’s serve and the Soviet player threw his racket – bizarre reaction given he obtained his third match point… which was converted after another Korda’s mistake. “Of course, I want to win once in my life, but if someone had told me three weeks ago that I’d be going to the final twice in as many weeks, I would have told the person he was crazy,” said the 23-year-old Korda, who had a 0-4 record in the ATP finals then (finished his career with 10-17). The victory marked the first time a Soviet citizen won the Canadian Open since its inception in 1929. “I’m going to New York for dinner and, of course, I’m going to get drunk,” a smiling Chesnokov said when asked about his victory celebration plans.

Chesnokov’s route to his 7th title:
1 Dan Goldie 6-1, 6-2
2 Sebastien Lareau 4-6, 6-1, 6-3
3 Stefano Pescosolido 6-4, 6-4
Q Shuzo Matsuoka 6-2, 3-6, 7-5
S Ivan Lendl 7-6(4), 7-5
W Petr Korda 3-6, 6-4, 6-3

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