paris93ivanisevic_medvedev

paris93ivanisevic_medvedev

Points won by each set: [ 36-29, 28-17, 41-32 ]
Points won directly on serve:
51 % Ivanisevic – 43 of 83
25 % Medvedev – 25 of 100

“I don’t care,”
Ivanisevic said after his phenomenal service performance (10, 5, 12 aces respectively). “They want five sets but I don’t want to play five sets.” He gave a hint of things to come when he blasted four aces in a row in his first service game, two at over 125 m.p.h. “I was playing great. Every time I wanted to hit an ace, I hit an ace.” Among Ivanisevic’s 22 titles, the most important is Wimbledon ’01 of course, arguably just behind is that one claimed in the French capital – he defeated five Top 10’ers of the 90s, including two out of three best players in the world at the time (Sampras, Edberg). In 1993, the 19-year-old Medvedev [8] was considered as a potential No. 1 in the not-too-distant future, on the assumption he would be as good on carpet and grass as he was on clay and hardcourts. Paris-Bercy was another step in his astonishing progress, but he paid the price having under his belt four more than 2-hour wins en route to the final. He led 3:2* (40/30) when Ivanisevic [11] served an ace, and since then the Croat was doing on the court whatever he wanted until 5:3* (deuce) in the 3rd set. There was a streak of 22 points won on serve by the Croat, and the Parisian crowd began whistling to express its disappointment of such an overwhelming advantage of a superior server… In the aftermath of the final, Ivanisevic never returned to such an amazing form indoors while Medvedev’s steady development was stopped after he lost an epic Wimbledon ’94 battle to Boris Becker in the fourth round.

Ivanisevic’s route to his 9th title (2nd and last Masters 1K):
2 Jonas Svensson 3-6, 6-3, 7-6(3) – 1 m.p.
3 Michael Chang 7-6(5), 7-5
Q Pete Sampras 7-6(3), 7-5
S Stefan Edberg 4-6, 7-6(4), 7-6(3)
W Andrei Medvedev 6-4, 6-2, 7-6(2)

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